NanoMeal-G Flyer

nanomeal Nanomeal-G provides a single serving of NanoGreens10, NanoProPRP and NanOmega-3 combined in individual sachets.  The perfect daily nutrition for travel or the business driven person with limited preparation time!

That’s the equivalent antioxidant intake of 10 organic fruits and vegetables, a meals worth of vegetarian omega-3 fatty acids and a small meals worth of protein – all in 1 convenient packet… just add water!!!

Click HERE to view the Nanomeal-G flyer page.

 

NanOmega-3 Flyer

nanomega-3NanOmega-3 from BioPharma Scientific, all vegan and organic ingredients for highly absorbed omega-3 support!

Click HERE to view the NanOmega-3 flyer page.

Below are 3 articles written by Dr John H Maher, DC, DCBCN, BCIM of BioPharma Scientific outlining the benefits of ALA, EPA and DHA as found in NanOmega-3:

Flax vs. Fish: The Alpha and the Omega

Flaxseed for Heart Healthy Nutrition

New Study: Dietary ALA sufficient to raise omega-3 levels

Here is a handy chart comparing the Omega-3 and Omega-6 levels in some common oils, nuts and seeds:

Omega-3 and Omega-6 Essential Fatty Acids

FLAX: get it into ya!

Nutritional attributes of Flax

Comparing Flax to a range of other Common Oils

NanoEPA

NanoEPA

NanoEPADHA incorporates the enhanced absorption technique of emulsification1,2,3 as well as a unique combination of equal strength (natural ratio) EPA & DHA, vitamin D3 and ALL 8 biologically active forms of vitamin E.

This fantastically efficacious product is available in two mouth watering flavours – Lemon Creme & Pina Colada; either of which will have you asking if this really is a fish oil!  You won’t find a better fish oil – especially for kids4.

Click HERE to view the NanoEPA flyer page

A host of clinical research is available to back technology and ingredients used in this product, below is just a taste.

EPA & DHA are the longest and hardest fatty acids for the body to process. While our bodies can produce small amounts, it is rarely enough which is why these fatty acids are classed as essential fatty acids (EFA’s).  In the following article Hans R. Larsen, MSc, ChE extrapolates on this point:

Fish Oils: The Essential Nutrients

1  Raatz SK., Redmon JB., Wimmergren N., Donadio JV., Bibus DM.,2009, Enhanced absorption of n-3 fatty acid s from emulsified compared with encapsulated fish oil., J Am Diet Assoc.,  Jun;109(6):1076-81.
2  T Seternes, IJ Haug, D Zeiss, LB Sagmo, IC Olsen, KI Draget, Gastric stable emulsions provide increased bioavailability of long chain omega-3 fatty acids
3  Iveta Garaiova, Irina A Guschina, Sue F Plummer, James Tang , Duolao Wang3 and Nigel T Plummer 2007, A randomised cross-over trial in healthy adults indicating improved absorption of omega-3 fatty acids by pre-emulsification, Nutrition Journal 2007, 6:4doi:10.1186/1475-2891-6-4
4  F.L. Weng, J. Shults, M.B. Leonard, V.A. Stallings and B.S. Zemel 2007, “Risk factors for low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in otherwise healthy children and adolescents” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, July 2007, Volume 86, Number 1, Pages 150-158

Can Vitamins Help Depression?

Can taking vitamins help depression? The answer to this question is, “maybe”. There are several vitamin and mineral deficiencies that can cause symptoms of depression. If you happen to have one of these deficiencies then a supplement will indeed help you. If your depression is caused by something else then obviously supplements will not be the answer. It certainly well worth a try, however, to take a good quality supplement before trying prescription medications.

A Good Vitamin Supplement Could Be Just What the Doctor Ordered

By Nancy Schimelpfening, About.com Guide

About.com Health’s Disease and Condition content is reviewed by the Medical Review Board

Did you ever wish that you could take a vitamin for depression? Well, for some of you it may be just that simple. There are a variety of vitamin deficiencies that can lead to depression symptoms.

The B-Complex Vitamins

The B-complex vitamins are essential to mental and emotional well-being. They cannot be stored in our bodies, so we depend entirely on our daily diet to supply them. B vitamins are destroyed by alcohol, refined sugars, nicotine, and caffeine so it is no surprise that many people may be deficient in these.

Here’s a rundown of recent finding about the relationship of B-complex vitamins to depression:

  • Vitamin B1 (thiamine): The brain uses this vitamin to help convert glucose, or blood sugar, into fuel, and without it the brain rapidly runs out of energy. This can lead to fatigue, depression, irritability, anxiety, and even thoughts of suicide. Deficiencies can also cause memory problems, loss of appetite, insomnia, and gastrointestinal disorders. The consumption of refined carbohydrates, such as simple sugars, drains the body’s B1 supply.
  • Vitamin B3 (niacin): Pellagra-which produces psychosis and dementia, among other symptoms-was eventually found to be caused by niacin deficiency. Many commercial food products now contain niacin, and pellagra has virtually disappeared. However, subclinical deficiencies of vitamin B3 can produce agitation and anxiety, as well as mental and physical slowness.
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid): Symptoms of deficiency are fatigue, chronic stress, and depression. Vitamin B5 is needed for hormone formation and the uptake of amino acids and the brain chemical acetylcholine, which combine to prevent certain types of depression.
  • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine): This vitamin aids in the processing of amino acids, which are the building blocks of all proteins and some hormones. It is needed in the manufacture of serotonin, melatonin and dopamine. Vitamin B6 deficiencies, although very rare, cause impaired immunity, skin lesions, and mental confusion. A marginal deficiency sometimes occurs in alcoholics, patients with kidney failure, and women using oral contraceptives. MAOIs, ironically, may also lead to a shortage of this vitamin. Many nutritionally oriented doctors believe that most diets do not provide optimal amounts of this vitamin.
  • Vitamin B12: Because vitamin B12 is important to red blood cell formation, deficiency leads to an oxygen-transport problem known as pernicious anemia. This disorder can cause mood swings, paranoia, irritability, confusion, dementia, hallucinations, or mania, eventually followed by appetite loss, dizziness, weakness, shortage of breath, heart palpitations, diarrhea, and tingling sensations in the extremities. Deficiencies take a long time to develop, since the body stores a three- to five-year supply in the liver. When shortages do occur, they are often due to a lack of intrinsic factor, an enzyme that allows vitamin B12 to be absorbed in the intestinal tract. Since intrinsic factor diminishes with age, older people are more prone to B12 deficiencies.
  • Folic acid: This B vitamin is needed for DNA synthesis. It is also necessary for the production of SAM (S-adenosyl methionine). Poor dietary habits contribute to folic acid deficiencies, as do illness, alcoholism, and various drugs, including aspirin, birth control pills, barbiturates, and anticonvulsants. It is usually administered along with vitamin B12, since a B12 deficiency can mask a folic acid deficiency. Pregnant women are often advised to take this vitamin to prevent neural tube defects in the developing fetus.

Vitamin C

Subclinical deficiencies can produce depression, which requires the use of supplements. Supplementation is particularly important if you have had surgery or an inflammatory disease. Stress, pregnancy, and lactation also increase the body’s need for vitamin C, while aspirin, tetracycline, and birth control pills can deplete the body’s supply.

Minerals

Deficiencies in a number of minerals can also cause depression.

  • Magnesium: Deficiency can result in depressive symptoms, along with confusion, agitation, anxiety, and hallucinations, as well as a variety of physical problems. Most diets do not include enough magnesium, and stress also contributes to magnesium depletion
  • Calcium: Depletion affects the central nervous system. Low levels of calcium cause nervousness, apprehension, irritability, and numbness.
  • Zinc: Inadequacies result in apathy, lack of appetite, and lethargy. When zinc is low, copper in the body can increase to toxic levels, resulting in paranoia and fearfulness. Iron: Depression is often a symptom of chronic iron deficiency. Other symptoms include general weakness, listlessness, exhaustion, lack of appetite, and headaches.
  • Manganese: This metal is needed for proper use of the B-complex vitamins and vitamin C. Since it also plays a role in amino-acid formation, a deficiency may contribute to depression stemming from low levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine. Manganese also helps stabilize blood sugar and prevent hypoglycemic mood swings.
  • Potassium: Depletion is frequently associated with depression, tearfulness, weakness, and fatigue.

Suggested Reading

Is Taking a Vitamin for Depression Better Than Drugs?

For more information, please visit this article’s web page.

BluePages presents evidence-based information for depression

BluePages™ is a one of a kind, award winning web resource, produced by the Centre for Mental Health Research at the Australian National University. It aims to provide its readers with the highest quality scientific evidence on interventions for depression plus consumer perspective and understanding.

Information about Depression prevention, symptoms, treatments and resources is provided in a simple to use format, easy to read format. The information presented comes from ongoing systematic reviews of all the scientific research on a specific intervention.

The BlueBoard is an online community for people suffering from depression or anxiety, their friends and carers, and for those who are concerned that they may have depression or anxiety and want some support.

The BluePages team is particularly sensitive to the issues facing sufferers of common mental disorders, with several team members having personally experienced depression or anxiety disorders themselves.

The Depression and Anxiety Consumer Research Unit, which manages BluePages, aims to promote greater consumer involvement in research content and practice by serving as a bridge between consumers and researchers. Its research program addresses the priorities and needs of mental health consumers in the community, and consumer perspectives in research.

Awards

2006 BluePages team received ANU Vice Chancellor’s award for community outreach.

2004 BluePages received Mental Health Website Award from the International Media and Mental Health Conference.

 

The ongoing provision of BluePages is funded by the Australian Department of Health and Ageing and the ANU Centre for Mental Health Research.

For more information, please visit this article’s web page.

Depression and B Vitamins

This week, into my mailbox came an envelope which read “A message from the Chairman of Beyond Blue: the national depression initiative”. I have visited the “Beyond Blue” website before and found no reference to depression having anything to do with food and the nutrition it contains. This has prompted me to write on B vitamins, a basic essential vitamin which is processed out of much of our foods. Other habits decrease this important vitamin in our intestines such as consuming alcohol, eating a boxed cereal for breakfast and wheaten flour breads for lunch. It’s no wonder depression has become a national issue. I have to ask, is it an illness, or is it a nutritional deficiency? Continue reading

Are you depressed?

In my mail box recently there was a flier from the Beyond Blue organisation. As many will be aware this was set up by the Federal Government to be a support and bridge to wellness for people with depression. Depression is a growing health problem, as our mind and emotions are very much part of who we are and how we are. Continue reading

Depression and Anxiety

Both Federal and Queensland governments note the critical effects of mental health issues on the health and wellbeing of people, with combined anxiety and depression being the second largest specific cause of disease and injury burden in Queensland in 2006. Ref: The Health of Queenslanders 2008: Prevention of chronic disease. Continue reading